free Photojournalism eBooks

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This book introduces a new research agenda for visual peace research, providing a political analysis of the relationship between visual representations and the politics of violence nationally and internationally. Using a range of genres, from photography to painting, it elaborates on how people can become agents of their own image.
The job of photojournalists is to capture a moment in time, to tell a story without words. Delivered in twelve easy-to-follow chapters, this book takes you step-by-step through the important aspects of making professional photos. Whether you want to launch a new career as a professional photographer or simply learn to take better pictures, this book will provide you short tips and simple tools to improve your photographic skills. Take your photographic... more...
What it is and what it isn't. This not a camera manual for the Leica M, nor is it a book that will teach you photography. Nevertheless, in Bertram Solcher's book you will learn a whole lot about your camera and how to use it, and about the art and craft of photography. This book contains a collection of illustrated essays that are meant to reveal the secrets of working with a rangefinder camera. To be more precise, with the best... more...
From 1936 to 1943, John Vachon traveled across America as part of the Farm Security Administration photography project, documenting the desperate world of the Great Depression and also the efforts at resistance—from strikes to stoic determination. This collection, the first to feature Vachon's work, offers a stirring and elegant record of this extraordinary photographer's vision and of America's land and people as the country moved... more...
In the desperate battle for Guadalcanal, every American soldier had to walk a thin red line between life and death. On August 7, 1942, American Marines waded into the Pacific island called Gaudalcanal. They encountered jungles, alligators, insidious malaris, and a particularly deadly adversary in the Japanese soldier. Only weeks after their defeat at Midwas, the Japanese were Gutsy, vicious, and prepared to give their own lives to... more...
For over fifty years, Freddie Foreman's name has commanded respect, and occasionally fear, from those who work to uphold the law - and those who operate just outside of it. With almost all of his compatriots - like the notorious Kray twins - now gone, Freddie is truly The Last Real Gangster. A true entrepreneur and businessman, Freddie was one of the great personalities of the criminal underworld. A man of principle, protective of his family and... more...
In March 1947 Lord Louis Mountbatten became the last Viceroy of India, with the mandate to hand over "the jewel in the crown" of the British Empire within one year. Mountbatten worked with various leaders to devise a plan for partitioning the empire into two independent sovereign states. During the remainder of his term, his daughter Pamela kept a diary recounting this remarkable time—from trips to... more...
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Photographer Nacho López was Mexico's Eugene Smith, fusing social commitment with searing imagery to dramatize the plight of the helpless, the poor, and the marginalized in the pages of glossy illustrated magazines. Even today, López's photographs forcefully belie the picturesque exoticism that is invariably presented as the essence of Mexico. In Nacho López, Mexican Photographer, John Mraz offers the first full-length study in English of this... more...
For ten years Camille Seaman has documented the rapidly changing landscapes of Earth's polar regions. As an expedition photographer aboard small ships in the Arctic and Antarctic, she has chronicled the accelerating effects of global warming on the jagged face of nearly fifty thousand icebergs. Seaman's unique perspective of the landscape is entwined with her Native American upbringing: she sees no two icebergs as alike; each responds to its... more...
Page: 1-10 results of 53