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This book presents a perspective on the history of theoretical physics over the past two hundreds years. It comprises essays on the history of pre-Maxwellian electrodynamics, of Maxwell's and Hertz's field theories, and of the present century's relativity and quantum physics. A common thread across the essays is the search for and the exploration of themes that influenced significant con­ ceptual changes in the great movement of ideas and experiments... more...
The Evolution of the Southern Backcountry is the story of an expanding frontier. Richard Beeman offers a lively and well-written account of the creation of bonds of community among the farmers who settled Lunenburg Country, far to the south and west of Virginia's center of political and economic activity. Beeman's view of the nature of community provides an important dynamic model of the transmission of culture from older, more... more...
Farthest Field tells the lost history of India's Second World War told through the joys and tragedies of a single family, the author's own. If you loved The English Patient or Rohinton Mistry's Fine Balance or Katherine Boo's Behind the Beautiful Forevers, you will love this book. Three young men gazed at him from silver-framed photographs in his grandmother's house, 'beheld but not noticed, as angels are in a frieze full of mortal strugglers'. They... more...
Analyze and compare the powers and procedures of the national, state, tribal, and local governments as they relate to sovereignty, land and resources, development, and representation.
The narrative begins on April 6, 1861. We meet an anxious Gideon Welles, Secretary of the U.S. Navy. He fears war is about to break out and is concerned that the Confederates will confiscate units of the U.S. fleet in southern ports. He is particularly concerned about the recently built USS Merrimack, one of the few steam-powered ships in the navy. On April 12, the Confederates fire on Ft. Sumter and the long, devastating war begins. Abe Lincoln and... more...
As medical science progressed through the nineteenth century, the United States was at the forefront of public health initiatives across the Americas. Dreadful sanitary conditions were relieved, lives were saved, and health care developed into a formidable institution throughout Latin America as doctors and bureaucrats from the United States flexed their scientific muscle. This wasn't a purely altruistic enterprise, however, as Jose Amador reveals in... more...
The history of the Garden State is filled with well-known events and forgotten happenings. German Americans opened the nation's first kindergarten in Hoboken on February 11, 1861. Prohibition brought more than two hundred bootleggers together in Sea Bright on August 15, 1924, to discuss a fixed price on their product. As America fought World War I and desperately needed ammunition, the T.A. Gillespie Shell plant exploded in Sayreville on October 4,... more...
Warsaw has an unenviable reputation in the minds of many: often invoked as the epitome of the brutal environment produced by Soviet aesthetics and planning, its name conjures up a grey, faceless world of tower blocks and Orwellian governmental buildings; its image – perhaps more so than that of any other city in the former Soviet block – inextricably tied to the fate of the Communist system. Warsaw appears to have been locked in... more...
The unforgettable account and courageous actions of the U.S. Army’s 240th Assault Helicopter Company and Green Beret Staff Sergeant Roy Benavidez, who risked everything to rescue a Special Forces team trapped behind enemy lines.   In Legend, acclaimed bestselling author Eric Blehm takes as his canvas the Vietnam War, as seen through a single mission that occurred on May 2, 1968. A twelve-man Special Forces team had been... more...
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