free Oceania eBooks

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Most of us take for granted the features of our modern society, from air travel and telecommunications to literacy and obesity. Yet for nearly all of its six million years of existence, human society had none of these things. While the gulf that divides us from our primitive ancestors may seem unbridgeably wide, we can glimpse much of our former lifestyle in those largely traditional societies still or recently in existence. Societies... more...
The Liawep were a lost tribe living in deep jungle in far northwest Papua New Guinea; as far as the outside world was concerned they did not exist. Marriott first heard about them in 1993, when their ''discovery'' by a missionary hit the headlines. He set out to find them himself, to hear their stories, their hopes, & their fears for their changing world. Banned by the Papua New Guinea government from visiting them, he assembled his own patrol... more...
Despite the heated competition for colonial possessions in Papua New Guinea during the 19th and early 20th centuries, the personnel required to run an effective administration were scarce. As a result, the Australian colonial regime opted for a quick solution - it engaged Papua New Guineans, often to perform the most hazardous and most unpopular responsibilities. Based on extensive interviews with former policemen, written records of the time, and... more...
Hawaiian culture as it met foreign traders and settlers is the context for Sahlins's structuralist methodology of historical interpretation
On the eve of Papua New Guinea's attainment of independence from Australia, Chief Minister Michael Somare referred to the new nation's cultural treasures as "living spirits with fixed abodes." He was referring to the prevailing belief of Papua New Guineans that everything is invested with spirit, not least the objects carved, modeled, or constructed for ceremonial, and often everyday, use. The Masterpieces Exhibition includes the most significant... more...
This is a summary of colonial rule in the Caroline and Marshall Islands.
Leviathans at the Gold Mine is an ethnographic account of the relationship between the Ipili, an indigenous group in Papua New Guinea, and the large international gold mine operating on their land. It was not until 1939 that Australian territorial patrols reached the Ipili. By 1990, the third largest gold mine on the planet was operating in their valley. Alex Golub examines how "the mine" and "the Ipili" were brought into being in... more...
In 1987 Fiji, which had often been regarded as a model for racial co-existence, surprised the rest of the world by staging not one but two coups. Most interpreters of the Fijian political scene saw the events as a result of tension between native Fijians and members of other ethnic groups. This text argues that this interpretation is simplistic. Instead, it points out that the May coup was a strike against democratic government by elements associated... more...
Pieces of the Vanuatu Puzzle presents the results of the most intensive and widespread archaeological investigations in Vanuatu for more than 30 years. For the first time the results of extensive excavations carried out on three islands in the archipelago are published. The sites span from the period of initial Lapita settlement through to later cultural transformations. The research has brought greater clarity to the early history of the Vanuatu... more...
Page: 1-10 results of 31