free Australia & New Zealand eBooks

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In the early 1970s, Australian governments began to treat Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders as “peoples” with capacities for self-government. Forty years later, confidence in Indigenous self-determination has been eroded by accounts of Indigenous pathology, misplaced policy optimism, and persistent socio-economic gaps. This record accounts for this shift by arguing that Australian thinking about the Indigenous is a continuing,... more...
The discovery of a powerful memory technique used by our Neolithic ancestors in their monumental memory places―and how we can use their secrets to train our own minds In ancient, pre-literate cultures across the globe, tribal elders had encyclopedic memories. They could name all the animals and plants across a landscape, identify the stars in the sky, and recite the history of their people. Yet today, most of us struggle to memorize more than... more...
A Companion to Chinese History presents a collection of essays offering a comprehensive overview of the latest intellectual developments in the study of China’s history from the ancient past up until the present day. Covers the major trends in the study of Chinese history from antiquity to the present day Considers the latest scholarship of historians working in China and around the world Explores a variety of long-range questions... more...
Using a comparative, interdisciplinary approach, Nationalism in Asia analyzes currents of nationalism in five contemporary Asian societies: China, India, Indonesia, Japan, and South Korea. Explores the ways in which nationalism is expressed, embraced, challenged, and resisted in contemporary China, India, Indonesia, Japan, and South Korea using a comparative, interdisciplinary approach Provides an important trans-national and... more...
The Liawep were a lost tribe living in deep jungle in far northwest Papua New Guinea; as far as the outside world was concerned they did not exist. Marriott first heard about them in 1993, when their ''discovery'' by a missionary hit the headlines. He set out to find them himself, to hear their stories, their hopes, & their fears for their changing world. Banned by the Papua New Guinea government from visiting them, he assembled his own patrol... more...
The six Australian colonies united on 1st January 1901 to become the Commonwealth of Australia. One of the reasons given for this federation was that the Commonwealth could provide a common defence. William Rooke Creswell argued that, as an island continent, Australia could not defend itself without a navy. He saw no point in having a 70,000 strong army if only one enemy battleship could destroy port cities and disrupt maritime trade and sea... more...
After immersing himself in the culture of a remote Australian Indigenous community for close to a year, the young Japanese scholar Minoru Hokari emerged with a new world view. Gurindji Journey tells of Hokari’s experience living with the Gurindji people of Daguragu and Kalkaringi in the Northern Territory of Australia, absorbing their way of life and beginning to understand Aboriginal modes of seeing and being. This compelling... more...
The Australian Aborigines first arrived on the continent at least 60,000 years ago. They almost certainly landed on the northwest coast by sea from the nearby islands of the Indonesian archipelago. That first arrival may have been replicated many times over. The following exploration and settlement of a vast and varied continent was a venture of heroic proportions. The new settlers had reached southern Tasmania, the point farthest from the original... more...
Fighting Hard tells a history of the Aborigines Advancement League, the oldest Aboriginal organization in Australia. As both a welfare and activist body, the League can be seen as the mother of all Aboriginal Victorian community organizations, having spawned a diverse range of organizations. This work discusses how the League influenced the fight for civil rights and took a stand against the government’s assimilation policy and how... more...
Why do Australians know the names of Charles Bean, Alan Moorehead and Chester Wilmot, but not Agnes Macready, Anne Matheson and Lorraine Stumm?   This is the hidden story of Australian and New Zealand women war reporters who fought for equality with their male colleagues and filed stories from the main conflicts of the twentieth century.   In Australian Women War Reporters, Jeannine Baker provides a much-needed... more...
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