Free eBooks by C. G. Jung

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For C. G. Jung, 1925 was a watershed year. He turned fifty, visited the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico and the tribesmen of East Africa, published his first book on the principles of analytical psychology meant for the lay public, and gave the first of his formal seminars in English. The seminar, conducted in weekly meetings during the spring and summer, began with a notably personal account of the development of his thinking from 1896... more...
C. G. Jung (1875-1961) was a preeminent thinker of the modern era. In seeking to establish an interdisciplinary science of analytical psychology, he studied psychiatry, religion, mysticism, literature, physics, biology, education, and criminology. He introduced the concepts of extraversion and introversion, and terms such as complex, archetype, individuation, and the collective unconscious. He stressed the primacy of finding meaning in... more...
Extracted from Volume 8. A parapsychological study of the meaningful coincidence of events, extrasensory perception, and similar phenomena.
In 1915, C. G. Jung and his psychiatrist colleague, Hans Schmid-Guisan, began a correspondence through which they hoped to codify fundamental individual differences of attention and consciousness. Their ambitious dialogue, focused on the opposition of extraversion and introversion, demonstrated the difficulty of reaching a shared awareness of differences even as it introduced concepts that would eventually enable Jung to create his... more...
A discussion of the psychological and philosophical implications of events in Germany during and immediately following the Nazi period. The essays--"The Fight with the Shadow," "Wotan," "Psychotherapy Today," "Psychotherapy and a Philosophy of Life," "After the Catastrophe," and an Epilogue--are extracted from Volumes 10 and 16. Originally published in 1989. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology... more...
The ancient Taoist text that forms the central part of this book was discovered by Wilhelm, who recognized it as essentially a practical guide to the integration of personality. Foreword and Appendix by Carl Jung; illustrations. Translated by Cary F. Baynes.A Helen and Kurt Wolff Book
These two essays, written late in Jung's life, reflect his responses to the shattering experience of World War II and the dawn of mass society. Among his most influential works, "The Undiscovered Self" is a plea for his generation--and those to come--to continue the individual work of self-discovery and not abandon needed psychological reflection for the easy ephemera of mass culture. Only individual awareness of both the conscious and... more...
In 1925, while transcribing and painting in his Red Book, C. G. Jung presented a series of seminars in English in which he spoke for the first time in public about his early spiritualistic experiences, his encounter with Freud, the genesis of his psychology, and the self-experimentation he called his "confrontation with the unconscious," describing in detail a number of pivotal dreams and fantasies. He then presented an introductory... more...
C. G. Jung and Erich Neumann first met in 1933, at a seminar Jung was conducting in Berlin. Jung was fifty-seven years old and internationally acclaimed for his own brand of psychotherapy. Neumann, twenty-eight, had just finished his studies in medicine. The two men struck up a correspondence that would continue until Neumann’s death in 1960. A lifelong Zionist, Neumann fled Nazi Germany with his family and settled in Palestine in... more...
In the autumn of 1912, C. G. Jung, then president of the International Psychoanalytic Association, set out his critique and reformulation of the theory of psychoanalysis in a series of lectures in New York, ideas that were to prove unacceptable to Freud, thus creating a schism in the Freudian school. Jung challenged Freud's understandings of sexuality, the origins of neuroses, dream interpretation, and the unconscious, and Jung also... more...
Page: 1-10 results of 26